WWI Helmets

This chapter covers helmets in WWI configuration. The paint, liners and chinstraps are all from WWI. Most of them were purchased in the USA by the author but some were found in Norway.

M16 Q66 (F.W. Quist) with WWI brown-green factory paint from 1916. Found in Norway, probably a helmet that was sent from Germany to Norway during the war to be reissued to the occupation forces.

The liner of the M16. Notice the leather band.

M18 W66 (Hermann Weissenburger & Co., Stuttgart-Cannstatt) with WWI factory paint. This helmet was among several found in a huge depot in Grorud, a district in the city of Oslo, Norway. They would have been sent to be used by the soldiers garrisoned there.

The liner of the M18 above. Notice the three liner pads and the WWI carbine-clip chinstrap.

M18 W66 (Hermann Weissenburger & Co., Stuttgart-Cannstatt) with WWI factory paint, also from the Grorud cache.

The liner of the M18 above. Notice the three liner pads and the broken WWI carbine-clip chinstrap, which is dry and stiff from age.

M17 ET64 painted in the classic 1918 camouflage scheme of brown, ochre (yellow-tan) and green with black dividing lines. Notice also the black line which follows the edge of the rim. Purchased in the USA from Paul Dorow.

The liner of the M17 above.

M17 T.J. 66 (C. Thiel & Söhne, Lübeck) regulation camouflage painted in brown, tan-green and green with thick black dividing lines. Purchased in the USA.

The liner of the M17 above.

M17 Si66 (Eisenhütte Silesia, Paruschowitz Oberschlesien). Painted in the classic colors of ochre, red-brown and green divided by black lines. This camouflage scheme is often seen in period pictures. Purchased in the USA.

The liner of the M17 above.

M17 size 66 (manufacturer unknown). Painted in brown, ochre and light green. This type of camouflage helmet that does not have the regulation-pattern black dividing lines is referred to by collectors as a “borderless camo”. Purchased in the USA from Paul Dorow.

The liner of the M17 above. Notice the naming "Petzolv.." and the unit marking 3./41. 

M16 Bell L 64 painted in tan and light green colors. Purchased in the USA from Paul Dorow.

The M16 Bell L 64 pictured from the front. Notice the oak leaf painted in light green. The oak leaf is the symbol of honour and heart of the German landser (the infantry soldier) of both wars. Another detail is the Bell vent lugs which are more rounded than the standard ones.

The liner of the M16 above.