Camouflage Helmets I

During the first years of the war, German troops used simple camouflage techniques such as adding mud/dirt to the surface of the helmets or affixing breadbag straps and similar devices for attaching foliage. However as the war progressed they systematically painted their helmets in a variety of camouflage patterns. Different painting techniques were used as well, from hand-brushing to spraying. Troops in motorized units had better access to spray equipment as well as a larger variety of paints. When spraying their vehicles and other equipment with camouflage paint, their helmets were normally painted in the same scheme as the larger field equipment.

In these chapters (I, II & III) you will see a diverse selection of camouflage patterns in single color, two colors and three colors. Norway had a garrison of 350,000 German troops, most of them posted in stationary defence positions such as coastal forts, air bases and naval bases. Their access to paint and spray equipment along with time to develop camouflage techniques and patterns are the main reasons for the great variety in camo schemes found in Norway. Additionally, the pronounced seasons including long winters contributed greatly to this diversity. Most of the repaint and camouflage helmets shown in these chapters reside in a single collection and represent only a small percentage of what has been found in Norway.

 

 

M40 ET66 multi-layer. The helmet was first brushed/sprayed with dark gray sand/woodchip paint, followed by a tan/olive green finish with woodchips.

The liner of the M40 above. Named to "E. Dahlhaus" and Gefreiter "Bergman".

M40 ET68 with an intense green sand paint. Notice the low vent hole which is a manufacturing flaw. The decal which is clearly showing through the thin paint layer is belived to be KM. Found near a KM coastal fort. There are several other helmets found with the same paint and texture in other Norwegian collections.

The liner of the M40 above. Named F.I.T. and the green camouflage paint is painted on the rim.

M42 hkp64 with rough textured tan sand paint.

The liner of the M42 above. Notice the tan paint spots on the front rim.

M42 hkp64 painted in grey-blue with woodchip in the paint.

The liner of the M42 above.

M40 NS66 Heer SD with dark gray textured paint. The paint contains beach sand and remnants from clam shells. This pattern blends in perfectly with concrete backgrounds such as bunker walls and roofs. Several other examples have been found in Norway.

The liner of the M40 above. Named to "Arendt".

M35 ET62 with white winter camouflage paint. This scheme includes a brushed whitewash layer and a sprayed white paint layer.

The liner of the M35 above. Notice the gray textured paint on the rim.

M40 ET66 with winter paint. Hand brushed paint which has turned more yellow over time (another Norwegian collection).

The liner of the M40 above.

M40 EF64 with hand brushed winter paint. The paint has turned more gray than yellow over time (Tommy Olsen collection).

The liner of the M40 above.

M40 NS64 with winter camouflage pattern. The white paint has been hand brushed in vertical patterns.

The liner of the M40 above.

M40 ET66 with winter camouflage pattern. The white paint has been hand brushed in patterns (another Norwegian collection).

The liner of the M40 above.